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Wednesday, 23 January 2013

Review: The Emerald Quest (Dragon Child #1)

It has been eight years since Tia was abducted by the dragons and taken to the Drakelow Mountains. She finally learns that her human mother is one of the High Witches that stole the DragonQueen’s jewels. The Witches used the power of the jewels to cast a spell over the lands of the six towns, preventing the dragons from returning to their areas. Tia is to remain captive until the jewels are returned to the DragonQueen.

Devastated by this revelation, Tia runs away, determined to find and return the jewels, and free the dragons from the spell.

Thus begins a daring and dangerous quest. But Tia knows no fear. She wants to show the dragons that she’s really a DragonChild not a witch-brat. She has courage and determination, a slingshot that never misses, and her DragonBrother Finn, who can blend into the colours and shapes of his environment, as companion.

Together the two set out for the High Witch Malindra’s castle at Drangur to get the first stone, an emerald. With the power of the stone, Malindra has command over all the animals. In the guise of a Trader girl called Nadya, Tia gets work under the Beast Master, and learns how the animals think and where the stone is hidden.

With great guile and daring, Tia steals back the emerald and, together with Finn, escapes towards Kulafoss to retrieve the second stone, an opal, from the High Witch, Yordis.

Dragon Child is a fantasy series full of excitement, adventure, and courage. Six witches, six stones and six books plus two amazing leading characters, all supported by the superb black and white illustrations to create an excellent chapter series for children aged 8+.

- Reviewed by Anastasia Gonis


Title: The Emerald Quest (Dragon Child #1)
Author: Gill Vickery
Illustrator: Mike Love
Publisher: Bloomsbury, $ RRP
Publication Date: December 2012
Format:  Paperback
ISBN: 9781408174128
For ages: 8 - 13 years
Type: Junior Fiction

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